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We're getting the band back together for PAPER TOWNS

effyeahnerdfighters:

fishingboatproceeds:

The experience of making The Fault in Our Stars was really wonderful because of the people involved: They all brought their talent and professionalism to the story and I’m so proud of the movie they made. 

It was all so fun and magical (and frankly so different from my previous Hollywood experiences) that to be honest I wasn’t particularly keen to make another movie—unless I could work again with people I really trust. 

And now it has happened! I’m really excited that the same team is reuniting to adapt Paper Towns. It will again be written by Weber and Neustadter, and again produced by Wyck Godfrey and Isaac Klausner. We’re working with the same people at the same studio (Erin Siminoff and Elizabeth Gabler at Fox 2000), and the project is being built around Nat Wolff, who plays Isaac in The Fault in Our Stars

Like any movie project, this will be a longish road with many potential roadblocks, but I know it will be lots of fun and really rewarding to work again with such passionate and talented people.

p.s. I’m an executive producer this time around, which is exciting!

Congrats and best wishes to all!!

rp0077:

micasablumpkins:

the-unpopular-opinions:

i really hate seeing children at gay rallies. in most cases, they don’t understand what they’re doing and what they’re promoting. i think most children are pressured into going to gay rallies by their parents and, therefore, pressured into believing in gay marriage. 

i really hate seeing children in churches. in most cases, they don’t understand what they’re doing and what they’re promoting. i think most children are pressured into going to churches by their parents and, therefore, pressured into believing in a magic man in the sky who will send them to hell if they touch themselves or eat shrimp.

omg

Olivia, my eldest daughter, caught measles when she was seven years old. As the illness took its usual course I can remember reading to her often in bed and not feeling particularly alarmed about it. Then one morning, when she was well on the road to recovery, I was sitting on her bed showing her how to fashion little animals out of coloured pipe-cleaners, and when it came to her turn to make one herself, I noticed that her fingers and her mind were not working together and she couldn’t do anything.

“Are you feeling all right?” I asked her.

“I feel all sleepy, ” she said.

In an hour, she was unconscious. In twelve hours she was dead.

The measles had turned into a terrible thing called measles encephalitis and there was nothing the doctors could do to save her.

That was twenty-four years ago in 1962, but even now, if a child with measles happens to develop the same deadly reaction from measles as Olivia did, there would still be nothing the doctors could do to help her.

On the other hand, there is today something that parents can do to make sure that this sort of tragedy does not happen to a child of theirs. They can insist that their child is immunised against measles. I was unable to do that for Olivia in 1962 because in those days a reliable measles vaccine had not been discovered. Today a good and safe vaccine is available to every family and all you have to do is to ask your doctor to administer it.

It is not yet generally accepted that measles can be a dangerous illness.

Believe me, it is. In my opinion parents who now refuse to have their children immunised are putting the lives of those children at risk.

In America, where measles immunisation is compulsory, measles like smallpox, has been virtually wiped out.

Here in Britain, because so many parents refuse, either out of obstinacy or ignorance or fear, to allow their children to be immunised, we still have a hundred thousand cases of measles every year.

Out of those, more than 10,000 will suffer side effects of one kind or another.

At least 10,000 will develop ear or chest infections.

About 20 will die.

LET THAT SINK IN.

Every year around 20 children will die in Britain from measles.

So what about the risks that your children will run from being immunised?

They are almost non-existent. Listen to this. In a district of around 300,000 people, there will be only one child every 250 years who will develop serious side effects from measles immunisation! That is about a million to one chance. I should think there would be more chance of your child choking to death on a chocolate bar than of becoming seriously ill from a measles immunisation.

So what on earth are you worrying about?

It really is almost a crime to allow your child to go unimmunised.

Roald Dahl, 1986

(via brain-confetti)

TEAM VACCINE

(via watchoutfordinosaurs)

NINETEEN EIGHTY SIX.

roald dahl was calling out the anti-vaccination movement as self indulgent bullshit //thirty god damn years ago//.

(via ultralaser)

Over 1,000 preventable deaths and 128,000 preventable illnesses since 2007 and counting

And this is only in recent history. I can’t imagine the numbers if we had data all the way back to 1986.

(via autistiel)

And thanks to anti-vaxxers, measles is back in the United States.

(via thebicker)

markankosappo:

morkaischosen:

thedreadvampy:

tomarou:

rosesakurax:

thatfilthyanimal:

ensorevolution:

Tiny Dragons That Take Care of Your Gaming Dice

http://www.themarysue.com/dice-dragons-becca-golins/#0

[SCREAMS] I WANT THEM

Cuteee

I couldn’t resist reblogging; NO REGRETS

TINY DARAELS

*incomprehensible noises at a pitch Matt Bellamy can only hit on a good day*

Pyro would like these…

(Source: noctemowl)

It turns out procrastination is not typically a function of laziness, apathy or work ethic as it is often regarded to be. It’s a neurotic self-defense behavior that develops to protect a person’s sense of self-worth.

You see, procrastinators tend to be people who have, for whatever reason, developed to perceive an unusually strong association between their performance and their value as a person. This makes failure or criticism disproportionately painful, which leads naturally to hesitancy when it comes to the prospect of doing anything that reflects their ability — which is pretty much everything.

Procrastination Is Not Laziness | Thought Catalog

I’ve posted this before but I’m posting it again because it’s just so important and really gets at the heart of why so much advice about procrastination, much of it targeted at people who have ADHD but are just considered “lazy,” fails. Before you can tell someone to “just do it already,” you need to think about the reasons they’re NOT doing it, like all the meanings they’ve attached to vague terms like “success” and “failure.”

(via brutereason)

Oh wow.

(via awkwardcarnivore)

That resonates too much.  As I sit on tumblr at 1 in the morning, avoid studying for a test I have at noon today. 

(via not-a-douchey-url)

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